Recent Forum Posts
From categories:
page 1123...next »
Apostolis (guest) 18 Oct 2017 06:57
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » On Modern Propaganda

Yea, that is the best way to spread propaganda.

And we need to actually solve the issues (with a reform or a revolution) instead of telling that an evil external enemy is the cause of radicalization.

by Apostolis (guest), 18 Oct 2017 06:57

That's the very point, no? The best propaganda is the one that focuses on real issues.

A modern propagandist takes a real issue, the more real the better, in fact, and uses it as a tool to destroy social capital. Spreading lies is so 1940's.

Take poverty and inequality. They would promote rich morons who say things like: "If you are poor, it's your own fault. Poor don't deserve to live. And, by the way, read more Ayn Rand!" At the same time they would promote other morons saying: "RAF was right all along! Hang the rich on lamp posts!"

What they definitely do not want to promote is people who search for solutions that would, as a side effect, increase the trust inside society, its social capital.

Other examples:

Is there racial injustice? Great! Let's promote KKK. And let's promote Black Panthers at the same time.

Gender inequality? Let's promote ISIS view on gender issues. At the same time promote those feminists that believe every man is a rapist.

Etc.

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 18 Oct 2017 05:40
Apostolis (guest) 17 Oct 2017 21:08
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » On Modern Propaganda

A talk from one the members of futurICT 1. (futurict2.eu/):
futurict.blogspot.com/2017/09/a-new-global-fascism-based-on-mass.html

Nonetheless, Claiming that propaganda alone leads to social change is what the system apologetics want.
The Communist Party of Greece (pro-ex-USSR) believes that the Eastern block uprisings (Hungary) were the result of a CIA operation.
The Western mass media are trying to convince us that the radicalization of people is due to Russian Propaganda / covert ops.

In both cases, there are real social issues like economic inequality and poverty that need to be solved. But solving them requires radical changes in Society that they do not want to have.

by Apostolis (guest), 17 Oct 2017 21:08
Adel NizamutdinovAdel Nizamutdinov 16 Oct 2017 18:30
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » A Microstory

Criminals are usually low in agreeableness. So that might be why they did not trust an agreeable and compassionate lawyer

by Adel NizamutdinovAdel Nizamutdinov, 16 Oct 2017 18:30
UX-admin (guest) 15 Oct 2017 08:28
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Finish your stuff

Congratulations on discovering one of core principles of UNIX: "do one thing and do it well".

Welcome to the family.

If you search for "the art of UNIX programming" by Eric S. Raymond, you'll discover the rest.

by UX-admin (guest), 15 Oct 2017 08:28
Sally (guest) 14 Oct 2017 20:25
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Finish your stuff

Also, Crossroads I/O

by Sally (guest), 14 Oct 2017 20:25

Thanks for spotting that. Fixed.

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 14 Oct 2017 05:05
DDR (guest) 13 Oct 2017 18:16
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Finish your stuff

Ribosome.ch, as linked in the article, seems to be a shopping site of some sort.

by DDR (guest), 13 Oct 2017 18:16
Jan Rychter (guest) 13 Oct 2017 17:53
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Finish your stuff

I think you make a fantastic point. The funny thing is that we got so used to libraries being "actively developed" that people get turned off when they see that a github repo hasn't seen any commits for the past year or two. The idea of software being "done" sounds alien to most of us.

I come from a Common Lisp background, where many libraries were "done", and since the language was standardized, there was little need to keep up with things. These days I write in C and Clojure, and here things evolve a bit, but it is still possible to have a library from 2 years back work perfectly well today.

by Jan Rychter (guest), 13 Oct 2017 17:53

I like the one about stupidity. At one point I even made a list (admittedly, a short one) of professions where stupidity can be a plus. Even a virtue to be cultivated.

One obvious choice was testing/QA. The smarter you are the less likely you are to even imagine really stupid failure modes. What an idiot would try to transfer $0 via our new money transfer system? Yet, as a tester, it's your job to try to do exactly that.

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 09 Oct 2017 20:48
Yuriy Pavainis (guest) 09 Oct 2017 16:34
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Why should I have written ZeroMQ in C, not C++ (part I)

Great stuff.
Personally, I've never liked exceptions handling.
Intuitively it was always messy to me and I believe that it is quite slow.
The way I see it, it is guaranteed processing for unexpected crashes, not normal error handling.
I always use C-like error handling, wrapping blocks in exceptions catch just to be sure it will not drop out God knows where..
I agree with assessment that C++ introducing more complexity to the game and slowing processing down in case of complex class relationships.
However, C is “flat” language which is good enough for low level work.
What about complex architectures?
There is no way you can do complex systems in languages like C – it is beyond human capabilities.

by Yuriy Pavainis (guest), 09 Oct 2017 16:34
Apostolis (guest) 09 Oct 2017 14:02
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » On Intellectual Honesty

"The importance of stupidity in scientific research"
jcs.biologists.org/content/121/11/1771

"The acceptance of failure can be empowering."
ryaki-org.blogspot.com/2015/12/the-acceptance-of-failure-can-be.html

For scepticists , it is very hard to communicate with others. They will just tell you the truth.

And this is why this blog is so enjoyable.

by Apostolis (guest), 09 Oct 2017 14:02

I can report from Switzerland which seems to be another counterexample. There's some anti-immigration talk from SVP here but nothing as grave and threatening to the integrity of the society as you see elsewhere.

How is it going in Scandinavian countries?

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 08 Oct 2017 18:23

The real world also includes very rich countries with high amount of competition, high taxes, low inequality and robust safety nets which are immigration attractors (Norway, Denmark, Finland, Sweden), which don't fit into this model at all.

by dottedmagdottedmag, 08 Oct 2017 16:10

Yes, specifications and protocols are a good thing but I was rather talking about the implementations here. Once you drop the last line of code from an implementation there's no specification left. What remains is the ability solve that particular type of problem, a pattern stored in your brain. And it's not easy to communicate those.

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 08 Oct 2017 10:10
Apostolis (guest) 07 Oct 2017 14:24
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Moral Dunning-Kruger

I agree when you say that the so-called righteous minority will be mostly silent under Dictatorship. Except from few people that have the innate ability to take risks or have a way of escape.

In Crete, the resistance was high in the mountains where Germans weren't able to find them and they had livestock to feed from.

If i were to put a person from the resistance into a village, he would be silent as well for fear of his life.

by Apostolis (guest), 07 Oct 2017 14:24

True. But here's the thing: In a free society I don't care whether that person or other is moral. They can't hurt me. What I am interested in is how will they behave once the shit hits the fan. And there's not much reason to be optimistic about that.

Also, the difference in morals between people in free societies and oppresive societies may be smaller than one would expect. Here's, for example, an article about West Germans ratting on East Germans to Stasi: http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/east-german-domestic-surveillance-went-far-beyond-the-stasi-a-1042883.html

by martin_sustrikmartin_sustrik, 07 Oct 2017 14:00
Apostolis (guest) 07 Oct 2017 13:44
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Moral Dunning-Kruger

Orthodox economists say that it is in our nature to be antagonistic. In the same way, you are trying to understand the nature of humans by looking at the behavior of people during WWII.

Doing this is wrong because the behavior of people is determined by the system or conditions they live in.
The systems changes the individuals and gives them properties that cannot be explained unless you look at the macroscopic structure of Society.

You can look at my latest article "Freedom and autonomy as emergent Properties." to find why.
ryaki-org.blogspot.com/2017/10/freedom-and-autonomy-as-emergent.html

by Apostolis (guest), 07 Oct 2017 13:44
tonsky (guest) 07 Oct 2017 06:26
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Kaizen of Programming

I believe python’s WSGI is exactly that. Zero lines of code, nothing to download/import/include, yet it’s pretty specific and very useful thing. There are web servers that implement WSGI, there are user programs that utilise it, but WSGI itself, as a glue between them, is reduced to exactly zero loc.

by tonsky (guest), 07 Oct 2017 06:26
appostolis (guest) 06 Oct 2017 16:15
in discussion Hidden / Per page discussions » Kaizen of Programming

The lines of code are not important. My personal interest with metaprogramming was because it enabled to define a model that would describe the properties of the software and not to decrease the loc.

In a more advanced way , type systems and specifically dependendly typed ones enable you to define the logic of the program and then help the programmer write the implementation.

by appostolis (guest), 06 Oct 2017 16:15
page 1123...next »
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License